female empowerment

Does Microfinance Reduce Poverty?

This blog post was written by our Engagement & Finance Officer, Sasha Watterson.

Over the past decade we have seen hundreds of cases which show the impact of microfinance on poverty. Over a three-year period, our monitoring shows that the clients in our savings-led programmes will have increased their savings fivefold.

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Whilst the savings provide a place to turn during tough times, loans help businesses grow. The members pull their savings together to form loans. At first, these loans are small, generally no more than £150. But as the businesses grow, members save more and the loan fund grows.

There are many ways to reduce poverty, but in the rural areas in which we work, microfinance and development go hand-in-hand. And what’s more, poverty alleviation through microfinance is highly efficient. Over the past decade, every pound donated to our Kenyan programmes has unlocked £12 of economic activity, either in the form of savings or loans.

Over the past ten years, Five Talents supporters have transformed the lives of our clients in a range of ways. The most important effect we see is an increase in dignity; rather than being given a handout each entrepreneur is provided with the tools to lift themselves out of poverty. The benefits of our savings-led microfinance model include:

  • Growing a safety net of savings: Microfinance effectiveness can be measured in financial terms. A central benefit of microfinance is that those who joined the programmes three years ago have grown their savings more than fivefold and each has an average of £133 in their savings account today. It’s important to think about these financial figures in a human context. Our group members typically have no savings when they join and live on less than $2.50 a day so this is a truly significant change. The practical result of this is that events such as drought or illness no longer push households into absolute poverty.
  • Building and expanding business and incomes: The main microfinance benefits are the investments made by members from loans which enable them to establish and grow their small businesses. And this is a long-term impact. Repayment rates in our Embu programme in Kenya, for example, are always above 98%, which shows that members are able to run successful businesses after receiving our training.  
  • Being able to meet basic household needs: Children indirectly benefit as members have the income to invest in their children’s schooling, diets, and improve the quality of the family’s healthcare. As a typical family has 4 dependents, by impacting 22,000 households our donors are supporting around 80,000 children. When we visit our clients, the biggest change mentioned by the majority of members is: ‘Now my children can go to school.’
  • Female empowerment: For Five Talents, the importance of microfinance is also linked to the impact it has on gender relations. Women are empowered to make decisions about how to save and invest their incomes and earn money for themselves, which increases their decision-making power in their households and communities more widely.

Microfinance success is always achieved when the model is designed with the client in mind. Each of these benefits is a result of a long-term focus on the dignity of the people we work with. We've seen this pro-community, long-term view work again and again throughout all of our programmes.

 

Financial exclusion of women is a global issue but how will our microfinance programmes help? Part 1

This blog post was written by our Engagement & Finance Officer, Sasha Watterson.

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Empowering women through microfinance is at the heart of what we do. 70% of the worlds poor are female. What’s more, studies have found that internationally, women are more ‘financially excluded’ than men. This isn’t just a developing world issue; studies in the US and Europe have shown women are more likely to be financially excluded (less able to take a loan for example) than men [FinMark Trust, 2016].

In 2012 the State of Microcredit Summit Campaign Report found that of microfinances’ reach, 82% of the very poorest were women. Too many women struggle to access financial services - even the most basic, like a safe place to save.

We know that financial exclusion is a major issue for women worldwide; women and girls comprise half of the world’s population but own only 1% of the wealth. [Advocates For Youth].  We see the result of this inequality in the lives of our clients. Before joining our microfinance programmes, many of our female clients were forced to rely on their husbands, fathers, or brothers when they needed money. They had no control over their finances, meaning they had no control over their futures. For women in poverty, microfinance offers an opportunity they have never had before.

But is all this empowerment having an effect? It’s easy to say the work we do is empowering but how empowering? Could we be doing better? All of these questions (and many more!) led to the decision we needed to independently evaluate our programmes - so that’s exactly what we did (and in next month’s post we will tell you what we found!).

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Women’s empowerment through sustainable microfinance is important, not only because it offers a route out of poverty, but also because it addresses problems of inequality. Research has found that women farmers are responsible for 60-80% of food production in low-income countries, but, globally, own less than 20% of agricultural land - and less than 5% of the world’s titled land [Advocates for Youth]. Giving women the chance to build and scale their own businesses is an effective way to deal with this inequality.

Research has also shown that women are more reliable when it comes to repayments, which is important when our clients are borrowing from a communal savings pot!

Providing access to financial services when accompanied by business training, increases women's’ decision-making power in the household and improves their socio-economic status in the community. In essence, for our female clients, it’s all about respect and self-empowerment. In our opinion, women and microfinance are a great combination!

And what’s more, the benefits aren’t limited to the women themselves. Studies have shown that women are more likely to invest extra income on the children’s education. Research has shown that when the mother controls the household’s budget, a child’s chances of survival increases by 20%.  [Journal of Health Communication]. Whenever we ask our clients what difference the programme has made, the answer is normally simple: “now my children can go to school.”